Email: acila@acilaa.com
Phone: +233 302 777 214
Welcome to

A C I L A

The Africa Center for International Law and Accountability (ACILA) was incorporated under US law, in the state of Virginia, on 20th October, 2015, and received its designation as a 501 (c)(3) research and education, non-partisan, non-profit, and non-governmental organization from the Internal Revenue Service of the United States of America.

On 23rd December, 2015, ACILA was incorporated under Ghanaian law as a company limited by guarantee and granted NGO status. 

International Law

We contribute to African scholarship through enhanced understanding of international law by conducting research on bilateral, regional, continental and international law…

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International Justice

We advocate justice for victims of international crimes as well as bring those who bear the greatest responsibility for the crimes to account.

Anti-Corruption

We conduct research on corruption and deploy public education on corruption issues. We empower citizens to demand accountability….

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Rule of Law

We press for adherence to the rule of law and advocate reform of bilateral, regional, continental, and international instruments.

International Human Rights Law

We research and conduct public education on International Human Rights Law on the African continent. 

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MONITORING COMPLIANCE

We monitor African States’ compliance with regional, continental, and international instruments. 

Our Vision

The vision of ACILA is an Africa without impunity, adherence to the rule of law and public accountability, and compliance with regional and international instruments.

Our Mission

ACILA’s mission is to promote human rights, international justice, rule of law, good governance, and scholarship on public international law in Ghana and Africa.

Highlights

Our Past Projects

  1. We implemented the first Vote Match project in West Africa in the 2016 presidential election in Ghana.
  2. We were the Rapporteur for human rights civil society organizations in Ghana for the United Nations Universal Periodic Review (UPR) process.
  3. We filed a submission to the UN Human Rights Council assessing Ghana’s compliance with its obligations under international law.
  4. Pursuant to our international human rights focus we were at the Assembly of State Parties to the Rome Statute of the International Criminal Court in New York.
  5. In Ghana, we are consulting for Corruption Watch with partners such as CDD Ghana, GACC, GII, and JoyFm.
  6. We are continuing our efforts at monitoring the implementation of the recommendations of the UPR.
Objectives of ACILA

Why ACILA

The objectives of ACILA are to:   
  • Contribute to African scholarship through enhanced understanding of international law.
  • Conduct research on bilateral, regional, continental and international law instruments that Ghana and African states have signed or ratified in order to enable Ghana and African states meet their obligations.
  • Educate the public about the bilateral, regional, continental and international law instruments that Ghana and African states have signed or ratified and their rights and obligations under them.   
  • Press for reform of bilateral, regional, continental, and international law instruments.
  • Empower citizens to demand accountability and responsiveness on issues pertaining to human rights, anti-corruption, good governance, rule of law, and international justice.
  • Monitor African states compliance with bilateral, regional, continental, and international instruments.
  • Design, develop, and administer training programs on bilateral, regional, continental and international law instruments.
  • Collaborate with domestic, regional, continental, and international bodies to foster the attainment of the stated objectives of ACILA.
AIJ Fund

Investigative Journalism Fund

Investigative journalists play a crucial role in the fight against corruption and engender demand for responsiveness and public accountability. Their evidence-based reports shine the light on corruption, name and shame, galvanize the public to demand responsiveness from public officials, and induce government, public, and private agencies to act.

Indeed, since Ghana returned to democratic governance in 1992, investigative reports by Nana Kofi Coomson, William Nyarko, Manasseh Awuni Azure, and Anas Aremeyaw Anas, to name but a few, have exposed corruption in several branches of government, which have led to public demand for accountability, and in some cases, induced government and agencies to act and implement reforms.

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